Tag Archives: rules

Legionary 2017 – May 13th Exeter Part 4 The Show

Up nice and early having packed up the car the night before, I set off to Legionary 17. The roads were clear so it took me 6 minutes to get to the show. How lucky am I.

In the past I have raved about how good the facilities are at the venue for gamers and traders, well this time I remembered to take a photo.

How many shows can you unload next to your table?

I had booked a 12 x 6 table. I started to lay out the terrain and place the figures.

The Plot.

The game was to be set around August 1814 when both sides were sitting around a table in Ghent brokering a peace deal. The Americans not wishing to have to give up any of their country following a reversal of fortune and the British trying to reinforce their position. To give them a better bargaining chip a force has been dispatched to seize the Washington DC. The scouts tell them the road is open apart from a few militia. The British ever confident set off.

The Americans have been tracking this force and have guessed what the British are up to. So to stop them they rush all available troops to the area. This means that to initially stop the British there are some militia infantry, Cavalry and a gun.

Here you can see the Amera Plastics river.

 

Looking up the table from the British view point

Across the British Lines. In the distance you may just spot some supporting gunboats. These were classed as heavy artillery but took a turn to reload. They could also not move as they were at anchor due to the current.

In the centre you may be able to spot the royal marine rocket team. These were the stars of the game and anybody who was watching when they fired, all commented on the process we use to see where they land!!!!

The game started with the militia units having taken up position behind the fences, just shy of the river. Just on the British side of the river waiting in the woods were 3 units of Indians. In our games Indians can deploy up to halfway across the table if in a tree line otherwise normal deployment rules apply.

The British fired their rocket – they decided to roll 7 sets of dice. A D6 for direction and a D10 for distance. The first two dice rolls looked good then a few wild rolls saw the rocket head towards the British units on the right flank. The final three dice rolls somehow correct the direction and landed the rocket within an inch of the original target.  Must get Nathan to pick next week’s lottery ticket.  The Freed Color units did not like this with one becoming shaken.

Not a great photo but you may just spot the Freed Color militia , the shaken unit has a white counter.

Rocket crew fire again. this time nearly taking out one of their own gunboats!

Heavy Militia gun opens fire

British are in the fields!

The  British advance continued and American reinforcements start to arrive. The American militia had a heavy cannon mounted on the hill by the church and so they started to fire. The first shot hit the advancing 1st Royal Marines.

Both sides traded shots and the militia taking the worst of it started to fall back. American regulars advancing up the left flank enter the woods to chase out the Indians. It takes 4 line and a unit of rifles to finally clear them out.

The remaining militia attempt to hold the ford!

American regulars advance into the woods!

Having advanced across the river they catch the Indians in a crossfire

Royal Marines advancing on the river, in the rear ranks are the 5th west indies regiment with the two Swiss Regiments Du Meuron and De Watteville in the middle (great flags).

View from the British end

View from the American end

The American advance down the left flank was not to continue as they were faced with the Canadian brigade and a rocket aiming at the American Right flank landed in the woods and 4 units had to test morale (Enemy units under flight path of a rocket have to test).

Canadian Brigade including Voltigeurs

Another rocket just misses the advancing British!

7th New York Militia and the Glengarry Lights trading shots when another rockets lands and frightens the horses making them shaken and a sound volley from the Glengarry finish them off.

The British push back the American Left and take the river but the lead units have taken a little too many casualties to pursue the retiring,  not retreating Americans.

A great game was had by all. It was especially great to get such positive feedback from the visitors and especially some new gamers  asking about the figures, rules and terrain.

Figures- Old Glory, Knuckleduster,Foundry,Victrix, Elite, Britannia and Perry.

Buildings –  Large house -Sarissa, small home and Church – Renedra

Trees – Mostly hand made(please see blog) and K&M.

Haystacks – Homemade

Fencing and Walls – Ebay

River – Amera Plastics. I think this is great value product

Hopefully you will get to see some better pictures as the photographer from Wargames Illustrated was on hand to take a few which I hope will be in the magazine soon.

A big thank you to “A Brush Too Far” painting service who helped me out with a number of units towards the end. Thank you Jono and Mary.

RULES – King George Commands and We Obey – see blog.

 

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Filed under A Brush Too Far, America 1812, Britannia Miniature, Demo game, Flags of War, Knuckleduster, Legionary Wargame Show, Napoleonics, Old Glory, Traders, Wargame Shows

Battle of Godfrey’s Cottage

Following the recent death of Jim Perry , I had a desire to watch a few episodes of his perfect creation Dad’s Army.

It also got me thinking about putting on a Dad’s army game for the regular monthly game. The only issue was that I did not want to play the large version I have taken to a number of shows as only two could make it this weekend. During the week I was in the shed looking for something and came across a set of WW2 skirmish rules called USSR – Ultra Simple Skirmish Rules. These are a small A5 booklet which I was given for free by Bolt Action in 2004 when they first started to sell their range. I am not sure if any of the boys have ever seen or even played these rules and I have to admit that apart from one game 12 years ago neither have I.

Having re-read the rules I saw something different in them which excited me. Yes they were simple, something I like but they also try to give a sense of camaraderie. This is how firing is done.

When any shooting happens a no. of D6 are rolled by the firer depending upon weapon, rating above  and modifiers are added to each die. The defender rolls a single D6 adds rating above and modifiers. Totals of each die are compared and from that a result is achieved. This depends upon the highest score compared to opponents lowest score. Very simple, but this is the clever bit. When defenders are in a group(1″) of another figure the rating added is of the highest member of the group. Therefore a group of conscripts with a sergeant add +4 not +2. This is explained in the rules as the sergeant communicating with his team and ensuring they learn  from his experience.

Yes I am easily pleased but I like this idea so

The Rules

ussr-rules

The main aspects

  • The table size is 1m x 1m, so terrain is important.
  • Simple mission generator – Not every game is necessarily a firefight
  • Casualties, as in looking after them is a key factor
  • No weapon ranges – you see it you can hit it.
  • Importance of senior officers and or training
  • Groups/Teams did not get the importance of this in game play until a couple of re-reads in.
  • Suggests no more than 1 squad per player, to maintain the command experience.
  • Targets infantry only games

Figures are classed as :

  1. Civilian
  2. Conscripts
  3. Veterans
  4. Sergeants
  5. Elites

I set about developing a simple test scenario. I laid out a simple 3’x3′ board. A  He111 carrying out a pre-Seelowe invasion, reconnaissance crashes and the crew and invasion plans must avoid capture and await rescue. The local home-guard have been sent to round up any crew.

In the terrain below the plane is in the NE corner, Godfrey’s cottage is the SE cottage and in the SW corner you can see the home-guard entering the table.

Battle of Godfrey's Cottage Briefings

German

Capt. Hertz Von Rental

Damn fools in Berlin.

The day before the planned invasion of Britain and they get you to do a daylight sortie. Just your luck, on the last run a lucky shot hit an engine and you have had to land. Most of the crew seem OK. In your last communication Berlin advised you sit tight and await help.

Group 1

Yourself – Veteran

2 crew – Conscripts

Group 2

2 crew – Conscripts

Group 3

2 crew conscripts (LMG)

British

Capt. Mainwaring.

At 17:00 hrs June 5th 1940 you have received an alarm that a German bomber was seen coming down, just outside Walmington. In fact, in the field next to Godfrey’s abandoned cottage.

You called the platoon out and have instructed the 2nd squad to wait at the Church Hall while you go with the first squad to round up the crew if any survived.

Godfrey reminded you to be careful as all the services were still connect to his house. Although the toilet may be a welcoming sight for him!

Your Squad consists of:

Yourself – Veteran

Wilson – Veteran

Jones – Veteran

4 soldiers – Conscripts

3 soldiers – Civilians

Due to ages, all move at max 4”

Objective

Reconnoitre crash site and capture crew.

 

Here are a few pictures of the game

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Godfrey’s Cottage

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Godfrey’s Garden

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The home guard cautiously advance on to the table and at the bend in the road split into two parts , one to survey the plane while the other continues on to the house.

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Crew mingle around the aircraft

sam_3915 sam_3917 sam_3920 sam_3925 The rules have no ranges for weapons due to the scale but this started to feel wrong especially as the crew had pistols only. A quick discussion and it was agreed that:

LMGs Normal 36″ Long 72″

Rifles  Normal 18″ long 36″

SMGs Normal 12″ long 24″

Pistols Normal 6″ long 12″

all would suffer a -1 when firing at long range.

As the home guard inspected the plane the crew who were now in the other damaged cottage opened fire with the LMG they had removed from the plane.sam_3929

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Pike is down and Walker is suppressed.

sam_3926 sam_3933The LMG rattled around the group and caused a couple of suppressed results and a down result! Good die throws from the Germans and poor from the British.

It took a couple of turns for Walker to recover and apply first aid to Pike.When a figure is classed as down the nearest figure must perform a first aid action. This enables them to check the down figure for their status; Dead, still down or recovered.  I thought this was a good aspect and while trying to “first aid”, a number of figures running the blaze of fire from the LMG ensured they also became victims or hid in cover.

Anyway, the home-guard recovered their nerve and returned fire eventually on the LMG team. Due to their leaders and some great dice rolls both crew became suppressed.

sam_3932Eventually one of them becoming Down and dead upon first aid from another crew member.

The other home-guard group came under fire from the crew located upstairs and having had another member die, sent a runner back to the church hall for reinforcements ( if they could have got to Godfrey’s cottage they would have found the telephone still connected and could have called).

This is where we finished for a break and some lunch. Everybody thought the rules were OK but would benefit from a little bit of additional detail.

I enjoyed it all and will certainly be adding a little more detail, so maybe watch this space for some suggestions.

Figures are all from the brilliant Foundry range

Buildings are Sarissa and Foxtrot Charlie while I scratch built the greenhouse.

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Filed under Charlie Foxtrot Models, Dad's Army, German, Sarissa Models, Skirmish, USSR - Ultra Simple Skirmish Rules, Wargame Rules, World War 2

January’s Game – The Bridge

Have had a bit of down time with war-gaming with Christmas etc.

Now I am back in the flow as we all got together for our first game of the new year.

We decided to put on an AWI game.

Background. 

Both sides had identified the need to secure a river crossing. The British had sent a small force to take and hold the objective. This included what can best be described as a Light Brigade consisting of Light infantry , Hessian Jagers and Indians!

Thankfully for the British they out marched their line infantry companions and made it to the bridge before anyone else.

Arrival for both sides was random, see OOB

Rules

We used our old favourites, Fields of Honor with house rules for the Indians.

Commanders

Americans – Laurie and Steve

British – Nathan

Umpire – Me

 

The Battle

The British lights had decided to strategically place themselves behind the fence line and await the on coming Americans. This was also described by the American command as hiding!

The Americans were the first to get their 2nd Brigade on the table followed the next turn with a quick 6 bring on their last brigade. The British were a little slower and at one point it looked like the Americans would be engaging in melee with the lights before any British support arrived. The Americans sent two brigades up the road and another towards the river beside the fields as they believed the river to be fordable.

The American lead brigade of militia got held up in a fire fight with the British lights, this in turn blocked the road and never really managed to allow the 3rd Brigade to pass them and get into the fight. The 3rd brigade got so frustrated that they resorted to deploying their artillery on the bridge to provide supporting fire. While this did help, it also blocked the bridge forcing the infantry to wade across the river. On their left flank they had crossed the river just in time to engage the British 3rd Brigade that had finally advanced up the road.

Both sides traded shots and attempted to engage in melee but the willingness and determination of the militia was never quite enough.

Attrition managed to whittle the Americans down in to a too weakened a force to carry the day. They withdrew in good order to fight another day allowing the British to sneak out from the fences and hold the bridge( American commander not me).

Here are a few shots of the game. Figures are Perry and Foundry and from both Nathan and my own collections.

American OOB British OOB

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This was the first game of AWI that Steve and Laurie had played and both confessed it was an interesting era and may possibly pick some figures up at their local show PAW2016 which is on in a couple of weeks.

 

 

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Filed under American war Independence, Fields of Honor, Scenarios, Terrain

November’s Game – Napoleonics

The consensus of the usual players was for a Napoleonic Game.

Having recently visited the Elite Miniature website I spotted a great scenario on there. I decided to give it a try. The basic plot is that a Spanish garrison is holding a town blocking the advance of the French. The British with a few Portuguese are rushing to help save the day.

Here are the Orders Of Battle

The table was 9×5 and dominated by 2 large tree covered hills and a large town in the the centre. The focus was the town and this would be the first time this type of feature had such a prominent role in one of our games and would test the rules.Map

French commanders 1,2,3 and 4 and their direct commands were placed on the French table edge.

The Spanish were the only Allied units on the table and they were holding the town. Initially one unit holding each quarter of the town, artillery on the road deployed facing the oncoming French and the Dragoons outside awaiting a suitable target.

The main French attach lead by Brigadier Heller advanced towards the village in columns with skirmishers to the front. As they got close the Spanish dragoons fancied making a name for themselves and charged. They contacted a unit of skirmishers before they had a chance to fire ( They decided to stand and fire but rolled a score on the fire dice for the range at which they fired that was greater than the distance to the cavalry). This meant they were automatically wiped out. The dragoons realising how easy it was carried on into the French columns. Here they hit a column before it could get into square but it held and for the next couple of turns a furious melee was acted out which ended in the dragoons being wiped out although they had inflicted some damage to the infantry. What this really did though was to brake up the attack so that not all the French hit the town at the same time! This gave the Spanish to move all the infantry to the half of the village nearest the French. In our rules each building represented can hold a battalion. Attacking the town gives the defender a +2 advantage. To get into the town the Spanish must either be destroyed or vacate a building which would allow the French to move in and then fight house to house). Over the next 6 turns the melee continued to ebb and flow with both sides at times thinking they had carried the fight. Unbelievably the Spanish morale held even though casualties were building.

In the meantime more French had arrived and were moving through both hills to envelope the town. the horse battery deploying on the hill to give supportive fire into the town. The British had also started to arrive. Deploying either side of the road and bracing for the expected French attacks.

Back in the town the fight was grinding to an end. The Spanish had gallantly fought to the last man. The artillery being the only surviving unit but that was in full route, not being rallied before it routed right off the table. The town was open for the taking. How could get to occupy it first? This was were the British were given a life line, by the French! A random event was drawn and it was “The master spy” card. This allowed the next activation card to look at the follow 6 activation cards and rearrange into an order that suited them. A very powerful card. This could have allowed the french to activate their units first and then place the “end of turn” card before any British card. Unfortunately this did not happen and in a panic the French place the End of Turn card as the next to be drawn, therefore ending the turn. Next turn the British were activated first and allowed them to move reinforcements into their end of the town. The French did move into their end of the town but now they would have to get involved in house to house fighting.

The British were not having a great day, their firing was not causing the casualties they hoped for and losing all faith they moved more and more units into the town. The French right flank came down off the hill to engage the British moving into the town. This advance was only halted by the late appearance of some British and Portuguese Light Dragoons to their flank. The Light Dragoons went in catching a French column in the flank. It did mange to hold though. This fear caused the remaining French units to all form square. I could almost feel the sense of Christmas coming early for the British artillery seeing this new dense target that surely even they could not miss.( They had been rolling terrible dice). The panic in the British was also true on their right flank as they abandoned their position upon the french cavalry coming down the hill and raced for the town, leaving a few skirmishers to stem the on coming cavalry.

Last turn of the day heard the British give a sigh of relief as the Portuguese infantry finally turned up. The French had their cavalry and Italian reinforcements also turn up. Everybody now have the confidence that they could win the day.

In all we had about 5 hours of full on gaming with many breaks for tea and chatting and an hour or so for lunch.

It was decided that we would leave the game as was and continue next month. So Part One is complete what can Part 2 hold? Will any more reinforcements turn up, will the squares hold, can the French clear the town or can the British clear it.

Figures and terrain  are all from my collection, mainly Perry and Victrix with a few Elite. Town and trees were homemade.

Rules – Our own house set called “King George Commands and We Obey”. See link to rules on side of page if interested.

 

 

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Filed under Free Wargame Rules, KGCAWO, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Scenarios

October’s Game – 12mm WW2

For our October game we decided to play an era I have not played for about 4 years and in a scale we have never played. I have had a few items in my collection but they have sat at the back of the garage unpainted.

That meant that the last month has been full of painting and basing. Luckily on the way I managed to find a few items on Ebay that fitted my requirements perfectly.

The rules we used were a slightly modified version of a free set from Panzer 8. While these are aimed at 1/300 they were easily modified for 1/144 or 12mm. Here is the link http://panzer8.weebly.com/ Their rule sets are great fun and picked up in just a few turns. We had done a bit more research on the attack and defensive values of our tanks, infantry  etc to get a better variety in the game. A great site we found to help was the GHQ WW2 Micro Armour rules site. http://www.ghqmodels.com/pages/military/freestuff.asp This site has rules and vehicle, infantry specifications that saved so much time in research. They also have scenarios for this and their other rule sets. ( Really like their ACW Scenarios).

The Scenario was the introduction one contained in the Rapid Fire Wargame rules set – The battle of Lingeves 14th June 1944.

This had a British battalion with support advancing to take and hold a strategic village. Unfortunately this was held by the 902nd Panzer Grenadier regiment with support from the 2nd Company 130th Panzer Regiment in the shape of a couple of Panthers!

Game Overview – The British no sooner had advanced on to the table and cleared the cornfields when one of their carriers blew up in flames, This was closely followed by one of the supporting Shermans.

SAM_3390

Turn one and a Carrier and Sherman already a blaze! Panther can be seen on the edge of the woods.

British bought their infantry forward and attempted to enter the woods and clear the Panther. Here they ran into a Panzer Grenadier Company. After a brief firefight they drove out the Germans and took out the panther with a PIAT.

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British clear the woods and advance on to the farm. Burning wreck on Panther in the background.

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Panzer Grenadiers holed up around the farm.

British pushed on and after a bitter firefight saw them clear the farm. They had also established contact with their artillery support which was starting to lay down some fire on the cross roads, Their next target.

German reinforcements started to arrive in the shape of another Panther and a company of Panzer Grenadiers in 251s

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German BHQ

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German reinforcements nearly hit by British artillery.

The German player decided that he had held up the advance enough and caused enough damage to satisfy his senior commander and so could start the withdraw ( It could have been the need to get home to watch the world cup rugby but I would like to think it was the first reason). All in all a good few of hours gaming and chatting. The rules will need a little work on for spotting etc but nothing too altering.

Here are a few other pics including a flyby by a reconnaissance plane!

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The recon picture. The explosions really stand out.

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British advance past their burning wrecks.

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British starting to outflank the farm

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Panther reinforcements. thankfully he moved just before the artillery barrage landed.

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The figures are mainly Minifgs with a couple plastic vehicles from Dragon/CanDo

The buildings are Hornby N gauge Lyddle End range and the farm is a card kit from Metcalfe. the cardboard kit is really good and great value for money.

The roads (15mm)are from Fat Frank via eBay

The hedges are Javis OO/HO flexible hedges, great value.

The trees are some old K&M ones, I have had for years.

The explosions are home made – These only took 10 minutes to make. Will show you how in my next blog.

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Filed under Scenarios, Terrain, Wargame Rules, World War 2

August’s Game – Like a lot of Brits we went to Spain.

I had received a request for a Napoleonic game. Steve had only played Napoleonics once before so I decided on an engagement battle with the British having the added task of trying to secure an point of entry. As was normal in the Peninsula, the British were outnumbered in cavalry but had their new secret weapon, Congreve Rockets! and hopefully the promised assistance of the local Spanish Commander, who assured the British he would be there as soon as he could.

The terrain was laid out. The British were to come on from the main south road (A) with a small advance force having held the hill line. The French were able to come on along the whole length of their edge. Both flanks had been secured with cavalry although poor leader abilities may mean that the cavalry may not be as active as the French commander (Steve) may like.

The Rules

Our own set ” King George Commands And We Obey”  KGCAWO.

The Forces

French OOBBritish OOB

The Map

the game was 10×6

Map

How it went

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SAM_3316SAM_3312

SAM_3330 SAM_3329 SAM_3328 SAM_3327 SAM_3326 SAM_3325 SAM_3324 SAM_3322 SAM_3321 SAM_3319 SAM_3318 SAM_3317 SAM_3313

The French came on to the table in a confident manner securing both flanks. Their brigade of infantry that started on the far right flank began to advance upon an increasingly isolated British light dragoons, who patiently awaited the arrival of the Portuguese brigade.

The Portuguese decided to support the Light dragoons by taking up residence in the village of Blanco Aqua which spanned the river.

The French columns of Grenadiers, eager to get to grips with the British started to advance upon the brigade holding the hill line. In fact they were so keen to engage they started to pull away from the rest of the French army. They had out-marched in particular the brigade next to them, who were in mixed order. The British gunners on the hill spotted them and switched to them as a target (No skirmish screen to protect). Worst still, although not sure for who they had drawn the attention of the rocket troop!  With a mighty whoosh the rockets screamed into the air. Nathan’s dice throwing allowed the rocket to head on a straight path towards the target, at least for a while. Then, all of a sudden the rocket started to turn, back upon itself heading towards the foot gunners on the hill. Luckily for them the last die Nathan threw was a 1 and so the rocket came down just short of the crew, forcing them and another two British units the rocket had flown over to test. Luckily all survived unharmed but it did mean that once the laughing had finished the French commanded commented that it may be a lethal weapon on shaky troops, if only it would fly correctly.

The French right wing cavalry engaged and destroyed the light dragoons but were driven off from getting closer to the village by some accurate fire from the Portuguese inside the village. It was at this time things were starting to get tense in the centre. The French had been steadily advancing upon the British with minimal casualties. The deployed light regiments in front of the attack columns really paid off. This was not true from the French Grenadiers who had suffered terribly. Luckily for hem the French left wing cavalry had managed to advance in support and this in turn had force the British heavy dragoons to retire and forced the end British line unit into square.

The next turn a fate/ fortune card revealed a previously unknown ford in the river. Whoever’s action card was drawn next decided where they thought the ford was and on a 4-6 it was there. The next card out was French Light Cavalry Division, they identified the river area between the town and the hill and threw a 6. This allowed them to advance through the river and threaten the British centre!

The French centre were in melee with their columns against Picton’s brigade. Only stout defending managing to save the day. With the light cavalry ready to pick off the remaining British, accurate and timely fire from artillery and the Portuguese in the town convinced the cavalry they may have advanced too far.

The Game was declared a British minor victory. What happened to the Spanish Commander. well he could arrive on any turn after the 8th turn. This came and went, as did the 9th, 10th and 11th. He never managed to get a way from his mistress in time to get to the battle!

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Filed under KGCAWO, Napoleonic, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Scenarios, Wargame Rules

Peninsula Napoleonic – Our Saturday Game 13/06/2015

Time for our Saturday game.

Nathan had never played Peninsula Napoleonics nor in fact 28mm. I decided to do a little scenario for him to get familiar with the troops and the rules. ( My own, King George Commands and We Obey).

The Orders of battle:

Allied

CinC – Exceptional 48″ command range

Army Guns – Foot Artillery Medium/ B/E/C 3SP

Brigade – Picton

Highlanders – B/B/B 3SP

Line – B/C/C 3 SP

Line – B/C/C 3 SP

Attached coy skirmishers – B/C/C 1 SP

Cavalry Brigade –

Light Dragoons – D/C/C 1 SP

Light Brigade

95th Rifles – A/B/A 3SP may skirmish, rifle armed

52nd light Infantry – B/C/B 3SP may skirmish

Attached coy skirmishers 60th Royal American – B/B/B 1 SP rifle armed

Spanish Brigade

Line – D/C/D 3 SP – may not deploy skirmish coy

Line – D/C/D 3 SP – may not deploy skirmish coy

Line – D/C/D 3 SP – may not deploy skirmish coy

Attached Skirmisher coy – B/C/C 1 SP

French

CinC -Poor 12″ command range

Brigade 1

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Light – B/D/C 3SP may deploy as skirmishers

Brigade 2

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Light – B/D/C 3SP may deploy as skirmishers

Foot Artillery Medium C/E/C 3 SP

Brigade 3

Line Irish – C/C/C 3SP

Line  Swiss- C/C/C 3SP

Attached coy skirmishers – C/D/C 1 SP

Chasseurs a Cheval D/C/C 1SP

Cavalry Brigade

Dragoons D/C/C 3 SP

Dragoons D/C/C 3 SP

The Game.

We had a 6×4 table with a village on each flank and a hill line that the Allies were defending .

The French came on in the same old way with the right flank brigade (3) taking the village ahead of them with a plan to advance through it and the orchard to engage the Spanish, defeat them and turn the allies’ left flank. All this while the other infantry brigades advancing under a skirmisher screen take the hill line. The French Dragoons there to exploit any gaps etc.

Well that was the plan!

All started well with both sides trading shots and no real damage. Turn 3 was a telling moment. The draw of activation cards did not go well for the French and the reality of a poor commander started to show. He was unable to influence the whole battle field, so the dragoons and brigade 3’s movement ground to a halt.  This timed with some first class counter battery fire silenced the guns in Brigade 1 who were supporting the advancing brigade.

The French centre starts to make it way up the slopes. The Pathetic British cavalry advance forward and could potentially threaten the French units in brigade 1 who are in Attack column. Not to worry the Dragoons will ride them down!

Turn 6 was the defining turn!

The second activation card was the Fate Fortune card. The result was master spy in play. Nathan won and so he looked at the next 6 cards and rearranged them to an order of play he wished. This allowed all his brigades to fire with devastating effect and his cavalry to charge into the side of my attack columns. The six card being end of turn, therefore my French never got to move. Over the next three turns his unit of cavalry dispatched two columns who all failed to react and form square or inflict any damage. Too  late I did manage to activate my dragoons to charge into the rear of the British cavalry, getting rid of them. My centre in ruins, a strong British presence still on the ridge and slow moving French Allies through the town we called it a day and a British Victory.

Here are a few pictures from the game and latest version of the rules.

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The Battle

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Picton’s Brigade holding the right of the hill

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British Light Brigade

Spanish Brigade

Spanish Brigade

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French Brigade 1 held up by British Light Dragoons

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French dragoons save what is left of the day!

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French Allies take the town

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French brigade 2 advances to the hill line

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Spanish move up and skirmishers open fire

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French Artillery open fire

KGCAWO rules V1.2

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Filed under KGCAWO, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Wargame Rules