Tag Archives: Spanish

Reinforcements – The Wargame Artist painting service

Almost a year ago I bought from a show a few packs of soldiers from a new manufacturer and therefore range.  The range was Napoleonic Spanish and the manufacture was Three Armies. I don’t have a large collection of Spanish but probably have always wanted to, not sure if it is the era, colourful uniforms or being an underdog. Whatever the reason I spotted these for sale and investigated. The figures I think are some of the best I have seen but buying them broke one of my main rules, do not buy figures from incomplete ranges. There were no grenadiers available at the time. The sculpture who is also the owner assured me that soon they would be available. The figure sat on the To Be Done shelf. Then about 3 months ago I spotted an advert for the Grenadiers and this reminded me I need some, so I ordered them. The figures are great and detailed as I hope you can see from the pictures. My only criticism would be that the bayonets are possibly too delicate for wargaming as a few had broken off in delivery and I have knocked a few off in handling.

On a slightly different note I had recently bought a painted British Napoleonic unit from Ebay and noticed that the seller offered a painting service. Following a chat I sent of a few units for painting. I must state that Sam at Wargame Artist admitted to not having a great knowledge of Napoleonic uniforms so I supplied the details, therefore any areas of the uniform that are incorrect are of my doing. Normally if I need units I send them to A Brush Too Far but Sam offered to turn the units around in weeks, definitely in time for my birthday.

Sam was as good as his word and last week the units turned up. The other great thing was that I was sent pictures at most stages to ensure I was happy with the work. Please check out the Wargame Artist site for details www.thewargameartist.com but basically there are two levels of service Standard and Deluxe. I sent figures for both services but did not request basing.

Spanish Walloon Royal Guard – Standard level

I think this unit is what sums up the Spanish Napoleonic era for me. Uniforms from a bygone age with bright colours giving a sense of showmanship. I really like the painting.

1st battalion Royal Walloon Guard. Only the first battalions in Spanish regiments had Grenadier Companies. 2 Companies of fusiliers and 2 of Grenadiers.

1st Battalion – The first battalion carried the King’s Colour while the other Battalions carried the Regimental Colour

1st Battalion – with homemade flag

2nd Battalion with 4 companies of Fusileers

2nd Battalion with Regimental flag

 

Irlandaise (Irish) Regiment – Standard level

 

Foreign Regiments in Spanish service were distinguished by light blue uniforms.

1st Battalion Irlandaise Regiment

1st battalion

1st battalion close up – may need to touch up the buttons

2nd Battalion

2nd battalion

2nd battalion close up of command. Buttons again.

 

Spanish Line Principe Regiment – Standard level

1st battalion

1st battalion close up – buttons need to be picked out in Gold. my error as I missed this detail off of my guide and did not spot in the updates.

 

Review

I needed to be more accurate with my details as I forgot about mentioning buttons etc but the work by Wargame Artist is great and turnaround time is fantastic. Thank you Sam.

I will detail a few more units in my next blog including some AWI and a few deluxe wild west figures.

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Filed under Reviews, Traders, Wargame Artist, Wargame Artist

November’s Game – Napoleonics

The consensus of the usual players was for a Napoleonic Game.

Having recently visited the Elite Miniature website I spotted a great scenario on there. I decided to give it a try. The basic plot is that a Spanish garrison is holding a town blocking the advance of the French. The British with a few Portuguese are rushing to help save the day.

Here are the Orders Of Battle

The table was 9×5 and dominated by 2 large tree covered hills and a large town in the the centre. The focus was the town and this would be the first time this type of feature had such a prominent role in one of our games and would test the rules.Map

French commanders 1,2,3 and 4 and their direct commands were placed on the French table edge.

The Spanish were the only Allied units on the table and they were holding the town. Initially one unit holding each quarter of the town, artillery on the road deployed facing the oncoming French and the Dragoons outside awaiting a suitable target.

The main French attach lead by Brigadier Heller advanced towards the village in columns with skirmishers to the front. As they got close the Spanish dragoons fancied making a name for themselves and charged. They contacted a unit of skirmishers before they had a chance to fire ( They decided to stand and fire but rolled a score on the fire dice for the range at which they fired that was greater than the distance to the cavalry). This meant they were automatically wiped out. The dragoons realising how easy it was carried on into the French columns. Here they hit a column before it could get into square but it held and for the next couple of turns a furious melee was acted out which ended in the dragoons being wiped out although they had inflicted some damage to the infantry. What this really did though was to brake up the attack so that not all the French hit the town at the same time! This gave the Spanish to move all the infantry to the half of the village nearest the French. In our rules each building represented can hold a battalion. Attacking the town gives the defender a +2 advantage. To get into the town the Spanish must either be destroyed or vacate a building which would allow the French to move in and then fight house to house). Over the next 6 turns the melee continued to ebb and flow with both sides at times thinking they had carried the fight. Unbelievably the Spanish morale held even though casualties were building.

In the meantime more French had arrived and were moving through both hills to envelope the town. the horse battery deploying on the hill to give supportive fire into the town. The British had also started to arrive. Deploying either side of the road and bracing for the expected French attacks.

Back in the town the fight was grinding to an end. The Spanish had gallantly fought to the last man. The artillery being the only surviving unit but that was in full route, not being rallied before it routed right off the table. The town was open for the taking. How could get to occupy it first? This was were the British were given a life line, by the French! A random event was drawn and it was “The master spy” card. This allowed the next activation card to look at the follow 6 activation cards and rearrange into an order that suited them. A very powerful card. This could have allowed the french to activate their units first and then place the “end of turn” card before any British card. Unfortunately this did not happen and in a panic the French place the End of Turn card as the next to be drawn, therefore ending the turn. Next turn the British were activated first and allowed them to move reinforcements into their end of the town. The French did move into their end of the town but now they would have to get involved in house to house fighting.

The British were not having a great day, their firing was not causing the casualties they hoped for and losing all faith they moved more and more units into the town. The French right flank came down off the hill to engage the British moving into the town. This advance was only halted by the late appearance of some British and Portuguese Light Dragoons to their flank. The Light Dragoons went in catching a French column in the flank. It did mange to hold though. This fear caused the remaining French units to all form square. I could almost feel the sense of Christmas coming early for the British artillery seeing this new dense target that surely even they could not miss.( They had been rolling terrible dice). The panic in the British was also true on their right flank as they abandoned their position upon the french cavalry coming down the hill and raced for the town, leaving a few skirmishers to stem the on coming cavalry.

Last turn of the day heard the British give a sigh of relief as the Portuguese infantry finally turned up. The French had their cavalry and Italian reinforcements also turn up. Everybody now have the confidence that they could win the day.

In all we had about 5 hours of full on gaming with many breaks for tea and chatting and an hour or so for lunch.

It was decided that we would leave the game as was and continue next month. So Part One is complete what can Part 2 hold? Will any more reinforcements turn up, will the squares hold, can the French clear the town or can the British clear it.

Figures and terrain  are all from my collection, mainly Perry and Victrix with a few Elite. Town and trees were homemade.

Rules – Our own house set called “King George Commands and We Obey”. See link to rules on side of page if interested.

 

 

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Filed under Free Wargame Rules, KGCAWO, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Scenarios

Spanish Dragoons

Recently my collection has been growing in too many areas as once again, I have been drawn into looking through the “to be painted pile”. To be fair these have been sat on my painting shelf for the last 4 months partly done but I finally dragged myself away from other areas to finish them.

I think the issue was how to paint Yellow, a lot of it and yet still look good? After a few false starts I settled on “Miniature Paints’ – Mustard” with a wash of Army Painter strong wash.

They are from the Elite Miniatures range and they were bought to go with my Spanish collection. The figures are not some of the best I have ever seen from Elite but they are the only ones they make. The choice of pose is poor; one officer, musician, standard and trooper. The detail on the trooper is less defined, when compared to their normal quality.

Numancia Dragoon Regiment

Like most Spanish dragoons the uniform was Yellow, a lot of yellow. Trousers, jackets with red turn backs, waistcoats. The only distinction was the facing colours on the collar, cuffs and lapels. In this case Black. Saddle cloth and pistol holders in yellow with white edging. Bicorn black edged in white with red cockade and plume.

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Filed under Elite, Elite Miniatures, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Reviews, Traders, Uniforms

Peninsula Napoleonic – Our Saturday Game 13/06/2015

Time for our Saturday game.

Nathan had never played Peninsula Napoleonics nor in fact 28mm. I decided to do a little scenario for him to get familiar with the troops and the rules. ( My own, King George Commands and We Obey).

The Orders of battle:

Allied

CinC – Exceptional 48″ command range

Army Guns – Foot Artillery Medium/ B/E/C 3SP

Brigade – Picton

Highlanders – B/B/B 3SP

Line – B/C/C 3 SP

Line – B/C/C 3 SP

Attached coy skirmishers – B/C/C 1 SP

Cavalry Brigade –

Light Dragoons – D/C/C 1 SP

Light Brigade

95th Rifles – A/B/A 3SP may skirmish, rifle armed

52nd light Infantry – B/C/B 3SP may skirmish

Attached coy skirmishers 60th Royal American – B/B/B 1 SP rifle armed

Spanish Brigade

Line – D/C/D 3 SP – may not deploy skirmish coy

Line – D/C/D 3 SP – may not deploy skirmish coy

Line – D/C/D 3 SP – may not deploy skirmish coy

Attached Skirmisher coy – B/C/C 1 SP

French

CinC -Poor 12″ command range

Brigade 1

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Light – B/D/C 3SP may deploy as skirmishers

Brigade 2

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Line – C/C/C 3SP

Light – B/D/C 3SP may deploy as skirmishers

Foot Artillery Medium C/E/C 3 SP

Brigade 3

Line Irish – C/C/C 3SP

Line  Swiss- C/C/C 3SP

Attached coy skirmishers – C/D/C 1 SP

Chasseurs a Cheval D/C/C 1SP

Cavalry Brigade

Dragoons D/C/C 3 SP

Dragoons D/C/C 3 SP

The Game.

We had a 6×4 table with a village on each flank and a hill line that the Allies were defending .

The French came on in the same old way with the right flank brigade (3) taking the village ahead of them with a plan to advance through it and the orchard to engage the Spanish, defeat them and turn the allies’ left flank. All this while the other infantry brigades advancing under a skirmisher screen take the hill line. The French Dragoons there to exploit any gaps etc.

Well that was the plan!

All started well with both sides trading shots and no real damage. Turn 3 was a telling moment. The draw of activation cards did not go well for the French and the reality of a poor commander started to show. He was unable to influence the whole battle field, so the dragoons and brigade 3’s movement ground to a halt.  This timed with some first class counter battery fire silenced the guns in Brigade 1 who were supporting the advancing brigade.

The French centre starts to make it way up the slopes. The Pathetic British cavalry advance forward and could potentially threaten the French units in brigade 1 who are in Attack column. Not to worry the Dragoons will ride them down!

Turn 6 was the defining turn!

The second activation card was the Fate Fortune card. The result was master spy in play. Nathan won and so he looked at the next 6 cards and rearranged them to an order of play he wished. This allowed all his brigades to fire with devastating effect and his cavalry to charge into the side of my attack columns. The six card being end of turn, therefore my French never got to move. Over the next three turns his unit of cavalry dispatched two columns who all failed to react and form square or inflict any damage. Too  late I did manage to activate my dragoons to charge into the rear of the British cavalry, getting rid of them. My centre in ruins, a strong British presence still on the ridge and slow moving French Allies through the town we called it a day and a British Victory.

Here are a few pictures from the game and latest version of the rules.

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The Battle

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Picton’s Brigade holding the right of the hill

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British Light Brigade

Spanish Brigade

Spanish Brigade

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French Brigade 1 held up by British Light Dragoons

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French dragoons save what is left of the day!

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French Allies take the town

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French brigade 2 advances to the hill line

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Spanish move up and skirmishers open fire

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French Artillery open fire

KGCAWO rules V1.2

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Filed under KGCAWO, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Wargame Rules

Painting, Painting, Painting

 

Well over the last month I have been playing so many games. Each though has had a side effect on me. Every time I played a game I got enthusiastic and started to paint for that era. So the end result is as many Wargamers find, is that we finish nothing.

I thought I would give you an update on the month.

War of 1812

I have managed to paint a unit of Glengarry Light Infantry. I will paint two units for this regiment. One in skirmish formation and another in line.  Here is the first unit in skirmish formation. I also got around to finishing the British Rocket Crew.

These are fantastic figures from Old Glory.

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American War of Independence

I have painted a unit of British Grenadiers. These are Foundry figures.

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War of the Roses

I managed to paint some pike and hand gunners, these are Perry Plastics. Having played a few games using the Flower of Chivalry rules we have started to add some local house rules or interpretations. I will also pull together a quick reference sheet. the main house rule we have added is reference morale outcomes. In the rules when  a unit that fails morale rout. we felt that this was a little dramatic so picking up on the ECW rules I use we say that the first failed morale causes the unit to become shaken and a second failure would cause the rout. I will explain more in a  later blog.

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Scottish Wars of Independence

Fired up by the war of the Roses games it got me thinking about all medievals. Below is a unit of welsh bows. These are EBOB figures with the three command figures being old Citadel Ral Partha.

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Naval

Not Napoleonic but 16th century Armada. I came home from work one evening and there on the table was the new Zvezda Armada Invincible. My wife had thought I would like it, having bought one of the ship models previous. I have to say that I think this will be a big hit. the only thing I think stopping it being a huge hit will be the limited number of ships (currently only two available with another 2 in the pipeline). The basic rules are great and the advanced rules look ideal. The gameplay is all carried out on wipeclean playsheets and the set even includes pens and cleaning pads.

So what do you get for your money.

 

The Box Set

The Box Set

2 model kits in 1/350 scale. HMS Revenge and San Martin

One of the two kits

One of the two kits

Game cards for both plus two additional ships HMS Swallow and Santiago .These are laminated and so wipe clean.

The ship sheets and order sheets.

The ship sheets and order sheets.

9 double sided hexed game boards, approximately C4 size. These have sea on one side and a mixture of shallows to land on the other.

Sea Boards

Sea Boards

8 x D20 dice

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29 movement tokens

2  marker pens

Wind marker

Fire markers

Quick start rules, Advance rule book and Scenario book

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The kits are great. They don’t take too long to put together and if you have the time I am sure they will look great with rigging etc.

This game is going to be a favourite of mine, especially when the next range of ships are released. I am even enjoying building the kits although at times I do struggle with my eyes and painting a steady line on the hulls.

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HMS Revenge No my painting is not that great. Transfers are brill. Gun carriages to paint. Transfers have to be put on as the ship is built!!!!.

 

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San Martin

San Martin waiting for the finishing touches.

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15mm Middle Imperial Romans

Many years ago I had designed and produced a range of Roman and Sassanids. As with most things my wargaming buddy at the time moved on to other eras and I did nothing else with them. Having found them again I have started to rebase them on 80 x 60mm bases. As I rebase them I will share with you. I also had camp scenes made. I really love the guy mopping his brow and there is also one drinking from a wine skin!. Some of the range have never been cast so I will have to dig out the moulds.

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Filed under America 1812, American war Independence, Ancients, Armada, Boardgames, Medieval, Middle Imperial Romans, Napoleonic, Napoleonics, Naval, Reviews, Scenarios, Scottish Wars of Independence, War 1812 America, War of the Roses

Unit markers for KGCAWO rules

Please find below a copy of the unit markers for the Battle of Vimeiro.

I think they are self explanatory.

You have the ratings for Fire/ Melee/ Morale  weapon type and wounds (OOOO) which is for a large unit of 4 strength points. Most have 3 and an S = Shaken. These are coloured in when appropriate so the status and strength of a unit is clear at all times.

We laminate and then colour them in with a erasable marker as the game progresses so literally no other paperwork. Wipe clean afterwards for the next refight.

I will try to do these markers for all scenarios if anyone is interested.

 

 Vimeiro Battle Labels

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Filed under America 1812, American war Independence, Battle of Bladensburg, Battle of Crysler's Farm, Battle of Lundy's Lane, Battle of New Orleans, Battle of Queenston Heights, Battle of the River Thames, Demo game, KGCAWO, Legionary Wargame Show, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Scenarios, Wargame Rules

King George Commands and We Obey

Having wargamed for far too many years to mention, it finally dawned on me how much money and time I have spent rebasing armies or learning a new set of rules. With that in mind I decided a few years ago to find a style of rules that I liked and base all my future rule sets and armies it.

My key requirements are:

      • I spend a large amount of time and money collecting units. I decided I wanted them to stay on the table long enough for people to see, therefore no casualty removal.
      • I hate the “my turn/your turn” approach. With that in mind I use a card based turn system. I first used this in my Dad’s army game. Depending upon the level of game you are playing, a playing card is allocated to each unit or in larger games brigade commanders and above. This also means turns are not all the same as an end of turn card can come up at any time.
      • They have to be easy to learn. The common approach should assist with this and it is then just about the era specifics.
      • As little paperwork as possible. Most units have a small tab on a base. This contains all the information you need so no other paperwork, in most cases. This could of course be kept separately rather than attached but I think in a demo game it also allows visitors to see which units are representing which.
      • Enjoyable. I am not too serious and enjoy a light hearted approach at times to rules. Have a look at my rocket rules. While they may be a little slow to enact, imagine the gasps as rockets snake across the field. You never really know where they will end up!

I like to discuss issues arising. One of the biggest challenges is for “serious” Wargamers is to look past their unit not getting activated and not firing, moving or engaging in melee. I remember in one game, a player arguing that units should always have an action. This came about due to the fact that in the first 3 turns his British artillery’s activation card had not been drawn. What rubbish he argued and most others started to agree after a while. I then raised the point of the British artillery at the battle of Bunker Hill. Not many were familiar with the battle but the British artillery could not fire for a while as the wrong ammo had been made available. This impacted upon their ability to join in the battle at a key moment and affect the outcome. How could you ever build that potential impact in to a set of rules?

Most of the players started to appreciate the idea behind the card system. The British player finally supported it fully as Lancers appeared on his flank only to be too far deployed from their commander to be activated. This gave him the chance to form square next turn and live to fight another day. I appreciate it is not for all but I love it.

With this in mind I offer my set of rules called KING GEORGE COMMANDS AND WE OBEY. They are suitable for the American War of Independence, Napoleonic Peninsular and the American War of 1812. Some aspects may be familiar and some not so. Ideas have come from so many rule sets I have collected over the years.

I hope you find something you like; if not then I hope they encourage discussion.

If you would like to see them in action then please come along to Legionary 14, Exeter, on the 3rd of May  where we will be presenting the battle of Vimeiro.

I will add some more scenarios over next few months.

Enjoy!

 KGCAWO rules

 

 

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Filed under America 1812, American war Independence, Battle of Bladensburg, Battle of Crysler's Farm, Battle of Lundy's Lane, Battle of New Orleans, Battle of Queenston Heights, Battle of the River Thames, Demo game, KGCAWO, Legionary Wargame Show, Napoleonics, Peninsular, Scenarios, Wargame Rules